Budgets

Miss the #KidsNotCuts Twitter Party? Here’s the Recap

Miss the #KidsNotCuts Twitter Party? Here’s the Recap

In case you missed the #kidsnotcuts Twitter party with our expert Lily Eskelsen (@NEAToday) as the featured guest, I’ve collected some of the tweet highlights. http://twitter.com/K12NN/status/269138110795882497 A brief excerpt from Ms. Eskelsen’s bio: President Obama recently appointed Lily to the White House Initiative on Educational Excellence for Hispanics, whose goal is to expand e... »

Fiscal Showdown & Reduced Federal Spending on Education? We Say Kids, Not Cuts

My home state is California, and we just successfully survived our own state version of the “fiscal cliff” when it comes to education. Here, they were called the “trigger cuts.” If Proposition 30 — essentially part of the June 30, 2012 budget passed by the legislature that needed the people’s thumbs up at the ballot box — hadn’t gotten that thumbR... »

Comparisons of Propositions 30 and 38, Via EdSource & the California Budget Project

Comparisons of Propositions 30 and 38, Via EdSource & the California Budget Project

This one’s from EdSource, a very reliable non-profit education news outlet. EdSource: Proposition 30 | Proposition 38 Comparisons This one’s from the California Budget Project, also a very reliable non-profit state budget watchdog outlet that has excellent information on education. California Budget Project: How Do Propositions 30 & 38 Compare? »

The November 2012 Save California Public Schools Toolkit

The November 2012 Save California Public Schools Toolkit

Step 1: Get informed. We’re on the verge of either saving our public schools from an annual cycle of disinvestment caused by budget cuts ($20 billion in the past 5 years) — or setting off harmful triggers if the November 2012 ballot initiatives to fund K-12 (or K-14) don’t pass. Proposition 30 and Proposition 38 are the two main solutions we can choose to revitalize our chronical... »

California Budget Project’s Analysis of Propositions 30 and 38, For November 2012

California Budget Project’s Analysis of Propositions 30 and 38, For November 2012

California Budget Project‘s Senior Policy Analyst and specialist in education issues, Jonathan Kaplan, recently released Budget Briefs analyzing the potential impact of two ballot initiatives in California that propose to fund K-12 education. This November, voters will decide if they want to vote for one, both, or none, and in order to do so, they’ll have to understand what each one ac... »

What My Students Wrote in a Free Write About the Strike

The Friday before the strike was anticipated to possibly start here in Chicago. I asked my students the simple question at the end of a quiz, “Should your teachers go on strike?” Here is a sampling of their responses. This was a free write so I just typed what they had written. “I Support my teachers cause they need more pay so they can help us get ready for the future” — Hakeem ... »

Why the Biggest Investigative News Journalism Story In Years Won’t Get Covered — Sinking News Ships Look to Profiteering From Education To Lift Them Into New Markets

The biggest investigative news journalism story in years — the wholesale attempt by the Gates, Broad, DeVos, and Walton Foundations and others to privatize K-12 public schools — won’t be reported as widely as it should. Why? Consider this: what has the Washington Post’s coverage of Kaplan U.’s for-profit college Pell Grant scam been like? Anemic? In 2010, the PostR... »

Change.org’s Support for Stand For Children Should (And Did) Not Stand: When Liberals Push An ALEC Education Agenda

Disclosure: I was sought out by and interviewed with Change.org back when they were seeking an education organizer; I like and respect many talented organizers there, and from speaking with him, I believe that Ben Rattray is a reasonable, thoughtful, person committed to social change. I’ve also written for Care2.com and similarly like and respect the many excellent bloggers and campaign staf... »

Fact Check: FAIL — Romney’s Claim That the Federal Government Doesn’t Pay for Teachers

Fact Check: FAIL — Romney’s Claim That the Federal Government Doesn’t Pay for Teachers

Regarding presidential candidate Mitt Romney’s gaffe: of course state and local governments pay for teachers. No one disputes that. But the federal government does also pay for teachers, whether it’s the local or state education agency that makes that decision, or if it’s indirectly through federally-funded state training and credentialing programs. The Washington Post’s Jo... »

Special Podcast: Weighted Pupil Funding & California’s Budget Process, 2012 — Call to Action

I just spoke with two impassioned and well-informed high school student leaders and a community coordinator at Californians for Justice about an emergency action to support public schools that they’re conducting in the next 18 hours, ending Friday, June 15, 2012. You can listen to the podcast here: Listen to internet radio with MOMocrats on Blog Talk Radio California’s budget must be p... »

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